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20100908
20100908
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
for us. as we transfer this treasure, this island, from the navy back to the city, i hope that all of us will remember the service and sacrifice of every sailor, every marine, living and dead. [applause] and the people who left from here and the people who serve today, risking everything, so that we can celebrate today. that legacy lives on in the young men and women who wear the cloth of this country and who are deployed around the world as we meet here today. when the famous or infamous bates 3 aligning closure process started in 1988, a final result of any individual base closure and transfer could not have hoped for a better ultimate outcome than what has been achieved in treasure island. the navy's charge is to dispose of property in a manner that promotes economic development. that has been done. the transfer of treasure island is a win for san francisco. it is a win for the state of california, a win for the united states navy, and a win for the american taxpayers who paid for this base and all the infrastructure that was here. because of this transfer, the american taxpayer gets
recycling at home and use these bins you see behind me. i do not want this to become a psa for our recycling efforts, although that is always good, and remember, it is the kids teaching the adults, which is always good. but this is good for the environment, good for the economy, and a san francisco can do this, cities across california and cities across america can do this. i will remind you of the great line by michelangelo, who said that the biggest risk is not that we aim to hawaii and miss but that we aim to low and --. it would have been easy for us to have a goal of 50% recycling rate by 2020. a lot of states, a lot of cities across the state, that will be tow%8x4รง:vw1qs8mna ++%uq when you do that, you get people to organize that quality of imagination, where people in the private sector and public sector, using the entrepreneurial and innovative spirit coming up with new ideas and attitudes that may seem untoward or a little controversial or extreme at first, but suddenly, when you peel it back and look back two or three years, you go, "my gosh, that makes so much since." if you make
care facilities. we went to her many times to help us with san francisco general and to help us with laguna honda hospital. one of the big reasons we are here was the ingenious legislation that she appropriately and wisely introduced on behalf of not just this city but cities and counties large and small up and down the state, and allowed us to leverage federal dollars. it is appropriate now she is in the federal legislature. that is state senator and current congress woman jockey spears j jockeyackie -- jackie spiers. the contributions, large and small, the current members of the board of supervisors, previous president of the board, all of those that contributed so much down at city hall, we are glad you are here, ed lee at the department of public works did, the principal lead agency in the government, thank you for your stewardship of this project. you did a great job. to louise cansell, who put out a press release acknowledging over 100 meters at that now adorn this extraordinary building. there is not $1 wasted in the commitment of public art. it was 2% set aside. if any
the superintendent updated us on earlier. and we heard a short update from susan wong on the ongoing review of board of education policies, and we will be taking that up in the next few sessions of the legislation committee. >> the next is a report from the augmented ad hoc committee on student assignment. commissioner wynns? >> i would like to take this opportunity if i may to read or highlight a lot of the time line of the actual meetings that are listed here in the agenda because the substance of the meeting was that we had the presentation of the draft proposals for the elementary attendance areas and the middle school feeder pattern. you have heard about that, and the point is not to discuss substance, but to highlight feedback. those were just introduced, as well as the transportation policy this evening for a first reading. on september 28, the theory is that we will be voting on those policies, that then by october 13th, that what will be presented to the board of education will be outreach, and on november 8, a monitoring and evaluation plan, and administrative regulations related to transp
are used -- youth, in fact. we started in may. we were one of the first on board. mayor newsom would go to the u.s. conference of mayors, and he would tell the we had this great program. my office kept getting calls. we have been talking to states and localities all over the country and really, due to the mayor's leadership, this 250,000 no. i think is largely attributed to that. robert miller, who is here, one of our early partners with jobs now, well over 150 employees -- 145 employees through jobs now. he will talk about that, but he will talk about this innovative online campaign he has got going to get this thing extended. robert miller. >> i'm director of veterinary archives, and i want to thank mayor newsom for having the fortitude, the foresight, and the temerity to stay with a program for the very beginning -- since the very beginning. he took a chance on main street. we want to take that chance on government. our first higher was in june 2009, and our last was yesterday, the last day before the door closed. we believe the program benefits both sides of main street. the employe
to do these events. it is a fantastic moment for so many of our principals and teachers. it gives us an opportunity to thank them for all they do for our children, our community, and our parents. it is a wonderful thing. we were sitting around and wondering why we never did this, so we are really glad this is the fourth year doing our teacher of the month and our third year doing our teacher of the year. i wanted to thank a few folks really quickly. we have had some fantastic donations to all of our teachers and our principles. they have no idea what we are getting -- what they are getting today. i am excited to be able to rattle off the price list. we have so many prizes to give. i want to thank linda from comcast and tony from chase. they have been our monetary sponsors. we are really thankful to them for supporting this endeavor we have done. we have so many other sponsors, which are all on the back of your programs and displayed. i saw sammy in the back. if you'd donated -- if you donated to this cause, would you please raise your hand or stand up for us so we can thank you from
also a trustee of the u.s. conference of mayors. mayors from all over this great state have assembled here today to talk about the energy efficiency conservation block grant program. this is a program that started in 2007, and it delivers funds directly to cities to be able to improve their energy efficiency, reduce their carbon footprint, and as important, create new jobs in our community. i will just give you a little background in this really quickly. program was originally thought of in 2005 when the u.s. conference of mayors launched its climate protection agreement. the agreement is a landmark measure across the country. the u.s. conference of mayors initiated it. it began with 141 mayors. it now has 1044 mayors that have signed on to the climate protection agreement, committing to reduce our climate footprint in each one of our communities. the energy block grant program has been an integral part of that. it gives us the resources to reduce our energy consumption and reduce our carbon footprint, and as i said, it also creates jobs. it has been the result of a lot of p
for having me here. i hope congress listens to us. have a great day. >> keep america working. keep main street working. >> when this program was announced at the federal level in early 2009, the first meeting we had outside the government walls was with the chamber of commerce, and with us now is the director of public policy both locally and across the state and nation in terms of helping is get this extended period >> thanks, and thank you, mayor, for your leadership on this. i do not have to reiterate how nationally and locally businesses are struggling, the economy is still struggling. we do see that improvements are coming. we see light at the end of the tunnel. part of that light, and i think we all know, is driven by small business, and that is where san francisco's economy is based, backbone of our economy, and nationally. we really depend on those jobs hired by small business. what this program has done for small businesses across the country has but a direct subsidy in to those small businesses that have kept them afloat in this last year, and some, as we just heard, even allo
for the labors to bring us to this day. [applause] >> i want to think on this pride weekend and assemblyman who is here who spent many years of visiting a friend of his who was a resident at laguna honda. before i bring up the next speaker, i will tell you this story are probably should not, but i am going to tell you anyway because it's so exemplifies the next speaker. i am going to ask that you imagine the scene. it is 1998. i am in the office with mayor willie brown, who i still could not find enough mr. mayors to say his name. louise comes in to discuss the future of laguna honda hospital. she had just won this huge settlement with the tobacco company. she was the first of any local city attorney to join in that lawsuit. at the time, a lot of people were arguing tobacco companies would overwhelm us. there will be all of these freedom of information act. you should not do it. she stood bravely and did it. she said to the mayor, and i will never forget -- she said "we have this opportunity. we can either use this money to rebuild laguna honda or we can pass it away -- piss it away." that was
recycling and composting programs, set aggressive goals, and keep us on track. without further delay, it is my pleasure to introduce mayor gavin newsom, who has some spectacular news. mayor newsom: i think this is the completion of your first week on the job. melanie was with the speaker's office doing similar work, so that we could be successful in san francisco and but in a position to make a lot of the announcements we have been making bore over the last number of years. i happen to think this is a big deal. i think that other cities across the country that struggle to deal with the issue of their diversion rates with landfills that are literally filling up, that are becoming floating regattas of landfills that are being pushed up and down rivers and across the coast and around the continent, that this represents an important milestone, the cities can think differently and act differently and do some of them substantially differently -- do something substantially differently as it relates to their waist. what we know, we do not think, is that 1 million to 1.5 million people are mo
uses, new and upgraded streets and public ways, bicycle, transit, and to the facilities, landslide and waters of the sow is for the treasure island sailing center, lan/services for expanded marine and, and a new ferry terminal and intermodal hub. construction bill the other oppose product would be faced and that its bid to occur over approximate 15-20-year period. the draft eir of death was potentially significant an unavoidable impact on aesthetics, historic architectural resources, transportation, noise, air quality, wind, and biological resources. please note the staff is not here today to answer comment on the draft eir. all comics will be transcribed and responded to in writing in income than responses document, which will respond to all written and verbal comments received, and make revisions as appropriate. i would like to remind all speakers this is not a hearing to consider approval or disapproval of the proposed project. approval hearings will follow final eir certification. your comments today should be confined to the adequacy and accuracy of the information and analysi
. we are no longer enrolling new employers. for us, we are at the status quo. we have a month left. we're working hard to get our folks ready for the transition. we hope to not have to do that, but we are preparing for pretty bad news. today, final push. the mayor will talk a little bit about the program as well. >> thanks, and thank you all very much for taking the time to be here. i actually just left senator feinstein, who has been a champion of this program. the reference that not to impress but to impress upon you that we need all the friends we can get all the champions we can get to extend this program. 3820 families are being served by this program. these are families, many of which -- close to, in fact, 1000 of these families were on welfare, and now pulled out of welfare and have the dignity of a paycheck and the dignity that comes with a paycheck. when they come back home to feed their family. that is not a rhetorical line. that is not a line just to place some politics. that is quite literal. this program, arguably, is the most successful stimulus program in the united stat
the senate republicans are wavering? are the states using the programs and have a lot of people that will benefit from continuing to use them? >> the common currency with all the states is that the color of money is green. the states we're going after are red. mississippi, texas, and states similar to those are read states. we believe that when the true facts are put on the table that people will believe this is a bipartisan issue. we want to keep america working. it is important for us to know that less risk is taken out of our decisions every day a small business owners. this will take a tremendous amount of risk out of our decisions for the next year. >they have used the program. i talked to a woman yesterday it with a delightful mississippi accent. she said this was the most successful program we have ever done. she said they could not spend the money fast enough. that goes to the same thing that trent and mayor newsom were saying. she said she had small business owners clamoring to take people off of the unemployment rolls. it is not left coast or east coast. it is every co
the publ department of public health was not doing. you cannot tell us there is no money in the city. there is a lot of money in the city. we provide services to perhaps 100 people a year for as long as 10 years or however long they need it. the doctors and psychiatrists we use volunteer their time. we probably under-pay our staff. that is fine. they're very devoted to what they do. the cost per client, per year is $3,500. conversely, it costs $34,000 to incarcerate the same person in the san francisco county jail. unfortunately, when people in up in behavioral health court, that is what happens. they will only release people to programs. there are not enough beds in programs. people spend more money in jail because of the lack of facilities for people to go into this is not just true in the city. it is true nationally. i have some national statistics. this report was written in 2006. it says that 62% of every incarcerated population, 62% of people in jails, state prisons, federal prisons, and private facilities throughout the nation have a serious diagnosable mental illness. it is f
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)